A little bit of what you fancy…

Well, having got this Chartership off the ground for round 3, I’m not doing very well with keeping my blog updated, am I?!! 😦 So, here’s what I have been up to over the past two months, bar holidays, Christmas, Birthday and life!

I decided that one course of action – having inherited new subjects last year – would be to better understand the areas I support and get better links with the department and, fundamentally, the students. So, I saw that the OTs have a book group, hosted in the library, which I promptly invited myself along to (being a great reader!). The book group looks at both fiction and non-fiction, through a mental health lens (so either the content is MH related, or we look at books as therapy). I’ve read some very strange stuff, in consequence, which is what I want to talk about here.

Our current text for January is ‘The Goldfinch’ by Donna Tartt and considers PTSD in relation to the main character, Theo, losing both his parents at a quite young age. He staggers about in society, moving from place to place and is almost like a piece of flotsam, at the mercy of the state, institutions (like school) and people; his best friend Boris, for example. Initially, I felt quite sorry for him, but as the book has progressed, I’ve just now got an apathy to see what exactly is going to happen. Is this a bad thing? He doesn’t wallow in self-pity, but he also doesn’t really help himself either. As well as the PTSD (or in consequence of it) he is a drug-addict, semi-alcoholic and clinically depressed. On one level the book is a commentary on the system and how it can not help, sometimes, but on the other it’s just a little bit depressing.

The previous book I didn’t even finish – Paulo Coehlo’s ‘The Pilgrimage’ – because the main character irritated me so much! How, I wonder, is it that we can engage so with some texts, while others leave us so unconnected? There’s a wealth of literature out there (I know, I have a lit degree!) about author assumption, but I think we engage because it is familiar, and if it isn’t then we don’t (hence my disillusionment with Theo – I want to shake him up!).

So, as well as having read some interesting/not so interesting books, I have also met more of the team and the students, which has really helped. And hearing their stories about how they use reading as therapy with their clients is really great. It also prompts me to make a case for libraries and the value they hold for the population as a whole – MH issues aren’t the sole province of the disadvantaged – however, there’s a section of society for whom literature isn’t immediately accessible and this is what libraries do…

More to come on this subject…watch this space…