MOOC(ing) Around Again!

#ocTEL
I’m doing a MOOC again, this time about Technology Enhanced Learning. I have to admit, we don’t do a lot of this at my institution; the focus is still on face-to-face or traditional lab learning. However, some colleagues have made inroads into webinar teaching, with varying results.
My impression of TEL is that it is very subjective to the area of study. For example, our A&D students (unless they are doing GD or some such course) probably won’t be using much in the way of technology as most of their stuff is still in printed form (I know this because, as manager of the serials collection they cause me some considerable headaches!). Whereas our tech students in Computing or Science, say, do engage more with the use of technology for learning.
So saying, I’m part of the Social Media Team and we are very aware that our students don’t use these platforms for studying. They will tweet if it’s too noisy in a study area, but generally if they have an information query they will come to the helpdesk to speak to someone. I’ve encountered very few information enquiries via twitter or FB, and these tend to be from overseas or distance students who are using these communication channels generally to be pointed in the direction of the relevant subject librarian.
One of the reflective questions this week is ‘[Am I] leaning towards one approach in particular on ocTEL, and if so why might that be? Perhaps you are employing strategies from more than one approach?’. The approaches to learning under discussion are ‘deep’, ‘strategic’ and ‘surface’.
I’ve always been a strategic learner: maximum gain for minimum effort. So, I use knowledge already acquired and assimilate this into a strategy for expanding on this learning without too much effort! Ergo, this blog post! I know quite a bit about social media and learning and so I am reflecting on this bit of TEL; the use of social media as a learning tool (discussed a bit further down in the post The Joy of Facebook).
For the purposes of this MOOC, my approach is mostly strategic, with a bit of surface thrown in, as I havent got too much time to devote to it. Plus, I wont be graded on it, so I am not too worried about being top of the class, as that isn’t the point.
As to social media being a valid learning tool…well, again, I suppose this is completely subjective and moves into the area we will be exploring in more depth next week. Watch this space…

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Open Access in Focus – Guest Blog part II

OA explained!

MMU Research and Knowledge Exchange Blog

Open Access

Guest Blog from Mary Pickstone, Research Support Librarian m.pickstone@mmu.ac.uk

This week’s Open Access (OA) blog will explore the different types of OA.

OA research articles are primarily delivered to the reader via OA journals – the so-called ‘Gold’ route – or repositories (institutional or by discipline) – the ‘Green’ route.

Gold Open Access is immediate OA ie accessible to the reader with no charge.  However, this route often comes with a charge to the author, the so-called Article Processing Charge, or APC, which is levied by publishers for articles published in their journals. The APC is therefore a charge to ‘pay-to-publish’.

OA journals operate under a variety of business models which have been developed to accommodate different disciplines, or the situation in different countries.  Some traditional subscription journals from the mainstream publishers offer an option of publishing OA articles in a so-called ‘hybrid’ model.  The author, or their institution or…

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The Joy of Facebook…

This is going to be a really quick post, due to the fact that I am preparing for my interview on Thursday and so should be reading rather than playing on social media. But that’s just it. Social Media is as much a learning tool as anything else. If we look at it in the terms of a classroom it goes something like this: you post stuff (you are telling the digital world something you have knowledge of…albeit possibly only a little and maybe second hand); other people comment on it (classroom discussion of the topic in hand, maybe increasing your knowledge thereby); you reply (question and answer sessions); you ask for opinion (homework, possibly?); other people post stuff and you engage in the same process in reverse (you are the learner). If you follow the right people, subscribe to the right groups, get in on the right conversations you can learn a lot from something that doesn’t seem at all like a learning process!

I mention this because we have tried to engage our learners using social media, but it seems that they don’t use it for learning, perhaps for the very reason stated in the last sentence. But I strongly believe that we can work with this and, even if we only use it for very specific issues (such as finding that naughty journal that should be on the shelf but isn’t!) that’s still valid learning engagement.

Anyway, it’s turned into a not-so-short post, so here’s what I was actually doing on FB. I think you might like it! (Oh, and you can find me on FB by following the link at the side of this page).

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