A Little Bit of What You Fancy…2

So, I am very, very excited. As I mentioned before, I’ve been attending the Occupational Therapy book group this academic year and, although the turnout hasn’t been brilliant, it’s been a fantastic insight into what my OTs think, do, work with, are up against, ad infinitum…However, due to how our courses work, the current lead is now on placement and will be leaving at the end of this academic year. Boo…

But, the other day, I got a message from the lead, asking me if I would be willing to take over facilitating the book group. WOW! was my immediate reaction (one of the lecturers had asked her to ask me if I’d be willing). I’m incredibly humbled and thrilled to have been asked, but had reservations about whether it would fit into my remit or not…So I answered that I would be privileged to take over, but would have to discuss with my manager about time, relevance, etc.

My manager was likewise thrilled and asked me a few questions about how much time it would take etc. As it’s already established, it shouldn’t be too much trouble to hand over and after that it is simply about doing the admin and promotion (which I have in the bag as our management services team agreed to tweet/disseminate through our comms channels at my instigation a couple of months ago…). So I have the go-ahead to try it for this year.

Immediately, though, my librarian head kicked in and I began thinking of how I could support this. I searched for some information on running a successful book group and found a very interesting Radio 4 site: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/features/book-club/running-a-club/ which I am going to investigate before I begin. There’s lots of other stuff on the web, but it is mainly about target audiences and the idea for us is that we open it out to people who aren’t necessarily Health and Wellbeing folk, but who are interested in reading as therapy and mental health issues…quite difficult. I think the first thing I need to do is to either find the remit (which the handover with the current lead may contain) or to write one…(poss with help!).

Anyway…it’s all quite exciting and I talked with my manager about how it reaffirms our role in the University, how it can help me create greater links within my faculty area (they’re good, but could do with being better) and how it also links us in with the wider profession (coming from a Public Library background I have much experience with Reader Development activities – I can bring in my previous experience of working with reading groups in my branch library days!). But first, have to get a meeting together with the lead…hopefully the Chinese curse doesn’t hold true – May you live in interesting times – because it is getting very interesting around here, with the new Uni strategy and my extra-curricular activities! Watch this space…

Reflective Practice, cont…

I’ve had a bit of a breakthrough today, in my block on how to go about writing my reflective statement. I’m really quite pleased by this and now feel a bit more confident about tackling it!

I’ve identified, using the PKSB, approximately four or five areas that I would like to concentrate on, and will critically reflect on where I am currently in these areas. One of the areas I feel I would like to develop is my management skills: while I have many years of managing small to medium sized teams, I feel I need to expand on these skills as they have taken a bit of a back seat in my current role. I still manage a small team but am only directly responsible for one member of staff. I dont do any recruitment and selection, sickness monitoring or behaviour monitoring, all of which I have done in previous roles. Likewise, my input into library strategy has been woefully neglected, whereas when I managed the Local Studies and Heritage Libraries I was in there at strategic level (almost).

So, this is another area I want to develop. How will I go about it? I intend to mention this at my yearly review and see what my manager can come up with. A training course? Attending a meeting? Sitting in on interviews? Not sure…all I know is that this is the way to go.

How will this help me in my current role? Well, an awareness of organisational practices and values is always valuable. In terms of strategic planning, I have to set the team goals every year and this feeds up the chain. Obviously if I get the chance to sit in on a strategy meeting (which I hope I could!) discretion will be required regarding any sensitive issues that may be discussed.

Anyway. I’m feeling much more positive about the whole thing today! Who knows what masterpiece will come out of this! Watch this space…

Reflective Practice Pt 1

As I mentioned in the previous post, I’m working towards my Chartership and it’s now well underway! Allez! as we say in cycling!
I’ve just started to look at writing my reflective statement and, oh boy, this is going to be a toughie! My mentor has suggested that I look at portfolios on the VLE, but I havent quite got that far…I’m still in denial, I think!

However, as well as my blog, which is a great place to organise my thoughts (and espouse on topics that I am interested in/have a vague knowledge of/get right up my nose!) I’ve started keeping a reflective ‘diary’, in the form of some word documents in a folder. Not the best way of organising my material so I am going to do a bit of digging around to find out if there is a better way to do this! I work with a few folk who are really into Web 2.0 and, while I’m no Luddite myself (wouldn’t be doing this if I was!), they have their fingers more on the pulse than me…

This week has also seen me putting together my presentation for the CILIP Changes to Chartership event, at Edge Hill University, that I have been asked to speak at! First time I’ve been head-hunted for a particular event and I feel incredibly privileged and grateful to be doing it. I was suggested by one of our senior managers as a speaker as I initially looked at Chartering under the old regs and, for reasons unknown, never got off the ground with it. So, I’m going to speak a bit about me, why I’m doing it and the things I like/dislike about the Chartership process. My presentation is still a work in progress but, when I’ve done it, I will use it as an opportunity for reflection on how the event went. I’ll publish the presentation at that point, but it wont be surprising that there’s a little narrative running through it (guess, I dare you!).

So, reflective writing…at the minute, my writing is confined to specific instances, rather than a holistic reflection of my role/development etc…I’ve had a few ‘learning experiences’ recently and have been noting these down as instances to reflect on.

Recently I had one student, not from our Uni, being incredibly rude to me, even though I wasn’t in the wrong. When I offered to pass her on to a colleague who would tell her exactly the same thing I had, she hung up on me and didn’t call back. It’s the old library adage; users will ask many times of different staff members the same question in the hope that someone will tell them what they want to hear rather than the truth!

My learning I’ve taken from the above? I wont bother arguing the toss with someone in future who isn’t willing to listen, I will just offer to pass straight over to another colleague or to the duty manager to reinforce the message to the user!

So, off now to do some investigating into reflective organisation. I’m now going across the office to bug our resident Web 2.0 expert! Watch this space…

Conferencing Madness

lilac presentation – KD

This year I attended the LILAC Conference, held in Manchester. It bought together a range of library professionals from all areas, not just HE/FE and this was great because I have had a wide range of library experience: from working in Public libraries and teaching information literacy skills to ‘silver surfers’ to working in a college library and teaching ‘digital natives’.

I loved this conference; I think it’s the best one I have ever been to (creep, creep). I got to see lots of innovative stuff being done with teaching and learning materials, and also with implementing and embedding information literacy into key skills and other curricula.

Colleagues who attended from my institution were invited to present at an exchange of experience event to pass on to staff, who didnt have a chance to attend, valuable good practices and lessons learned. My presentation is attached to this post. I focused on what I had learned, what I had come away with as a holistic whole, rather than focusing on the minutiae of the how and the why. This is me though, big picture girl, ideas girl; throw it out and sit back to watch the fun! (You may notice a theme running through my presentation!).

So, given the wealth of experience and innovation out there, why is it still so difficult for those outside of the library and information profession to value our worth? My own feeling is that we are still considered somewhat twee, a little behind-the-times (blatantly untrue!), be-spectacled do-gooders who guard knowledge possessively. As we know, and are endeavouring to promote, this is far from the mark of a librarian’s true goal. We must be more in the vanguard rather than bringing up the rear and perhaps a little more vocal (and dare I say it, pro-active?) about the range of skills we can support that are transferable across all sectors and walks of life and that can lead receivers to achieve that bit better a life. Watch this space…